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kohalin studio

kohalin studio
design and branding studio

The composition of competences, together with the width and character of the Note design collective, is a result of an analysis of a designer role in change.

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Project

KOHALIN is an experienced design and strategy agency. We help transform brands and businesses through carefully crafted design and rigorous strategic thinking.

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client

Nous remercions nos clients de nous avoir fait confiance pour la réalisation de leurs projets.

Article

Article

Creativity is about searching for what is missing, to constantly realign thoughts and expressions to find that moment of insight when everything clicks.

our philosophy
KOHALIN Toute l'ambition des grandes aventures
Creativity is about searching for what is missing, to constantly realign thoughts and expressions to find that moment of insight when everything clicks. At Note we collaborate intensely, with personal passion and our design disciplines – interior, product, graphic, architecture, and strategies – to share our insights with the world. The composition of competences, together with the width and character of the Note design collective, is a result of an analysis of a designer role in change. Also the ability of adapting to the demands of today’s market, without compromising the own — unique — expression of Note Design Studio. Note is a Stockholm-based studio of design founded in 2008 working within the fields of architecture, interiors, products, graphic design and design strategy.
our team
We're There From the Start to the Finish
We Make Special Things. Sometimes a plan just comes together, but most of the time it takes a lot of hard work and collaboration with good people. We can help with that last part. Before starting any journey we begin with a strategy session. Our reasearch focuses on messaging and building the main characters of the story we are about to tell.
Hamid Ghavampouri
au service de
votre image
Hamid loves to explore and build things. He's had a weird creative career which started with farm equipment in Kentucky before moving to the big city of Nashville. During this time he gained a lot of experience working in the technology and entertainment industries. Hamid s main strength is understanding perspectives of clients and end-users and the thought process to craft a solid experience based on this insight. When he's not designing or building digital experiences he enjoys travel, being outdoors, hiking and dreaming of what to do next.
Hamed Hashemi-Far
au service de
votre image
Hamid loves to explore and build things. He's had a weird creative career which started with farm equipment in Kentucky before moving to the big city of Nashville. During this time he gained a lot of experience working in the technology and entertainment industries. Hamid s main strength is understanding perspectives of clients and end-users and the thought process to craft a solid experience based on this insight. When he's not designing or building digital experiences he enjoys travel, being outdoors, hiking and dreaming of what to do next.
Pierre Morel
au service de
votre image
Hamid loves to explore and build things. He's had a weird creative career which started with farm equipment in Kentucky before moving to the big city of Nashville. During this time he gained a lot of experience working in the technology and entertainment industries. Hamid s main strength is understanding perspectives of clients and end-users and the thought process to craft a solid experience based on this insight. When he's not designing or building digital experiences he enjoys travel, being outdoors, hiking and dreaming of what to do next.
Hanane Arjomandi
au service de
votre image
We Make Special Things. Sometimes a plan just comes together, but most of the time it takes a lot of hard work and collaboration with good people. We can help with that last part. Before starting any journey we begin with a strategy session. Our reasearch focuses on messaging and building the main characters of the story we are about to tell.
services
Créativité et technologie au service de votre image
Aider nos clients à obtenir et conserver une image de marque attractive et engageante, c’est ce que nous faisons chaque jour. Grâce au Design, à la technologie et à une approche stratégique au cas par cas, nous savons comment aider votre entreprise à devenir mieux identifiable, plus remarquable, moins comparable.
  • Projects
    • character
    • tizer
    • sewing machine
    • bottle Design
    • Sewing Machine
    • defhtedh
    • branding
    • product1
    • photography1
something
Hello World
something
Hello World
something
Hello World
something
Hello World
something
Hello World
something
Hello World

Product Design

Sewing Machine

New design for a sewing machine popular of Kachiran (Iran sewing machine)

bottle Design

New design of bottle of Fruit juice for new generation

sewing machine

sewing machine of new generation for the yong people

tizer

It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran.

Brand Design

Photography

Character

character

This character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activity

Video

Packaging

Website Design

defhtedh

dfhndtftht

Exhibition / Architect

branding

branding 1 Iintro text

photography1

photography1 Iintro text

Advetising

product1

product1 Iintro text

IK
Company of the doors special
sayeban e no is a leadingretailer and manufacturer of blinds and shades. founded in 2001starting with roller blinds, we went on to expand into woven blinds and pleated blinds. sayeban...
placeholder
placeholder
Sayeban No
Product Doller Blinds
sayeban e no is a leading retailer and manufacturer of blinds and shades. founded in 2001starting with roller blinds, we went on to expand into woven blinds and pleated blinds....
Kachiran
Iran Sewing Machine Mfg.Co.
Kachiran was found in 1980, aiming to manufacture high quality home sewing machines to meet the local demand and to export to other countries around the world. Kachiran factory was...
placeholder
placeholder
Himalia
Produce Refrigerator
Refrigerator Designer Factory - Parto Sard Tavan (Himalia) Himalaya Refrigeration Products has a long standing records since 1985 in the manufacturing of high quality commercial refrigeration products as well as...
creative

Design

UX & UI Design

What Does A UX Designer Actually Do?

If you’re a UX designer, it aims to equip you with a clear and concise answer to the question — What does a UX Designer do? And for those of you who are genuinely still unsure what a UX designer does, you will definitely know by the end of this post!

Apple’s Product Development Process – Inside the World’s Greatest Design Organization

Apple’s Product Development Process may be one of the most successful design processes ever implemented. With the company verging on becoming the world’s first $1 trillion business organization – there’s a lot that designers can learn from Apple and introduce into their own design environments.

User Experience Basics

User experience (UX) focuses on having a deep understanding of users, what they need, what they value, their abilities, and also their limitations.

Logiciele

Game

video1

video1 Iintro text

website1

Iintro text website1

Data Analyse

caracter1

Iintro text caracter1

Character

character
IK
This character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activity

This character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activityThis character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activityThis character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activityThis character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activityThis character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activityThis character designed for brand personality of IK company & for introduction of his activity

Product Design

tizer
Kachiran
It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran.

It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. It is a tizer for presentation of new & modern technology on product of Kachiran. 

Product Design

sewing machine
kachiran
sewing machine of new generation for the yong people

sewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong peoplesewing machine of new generation for the yong people

Product Design

bottle Design
Sirafan
New design of bottle of Fruit juice for new generation

Aider nos clients à obtenir et conserver une image de marque attractive et engageante, c’est ce que nous faisons chaque jour. Grâce au Design, à la technologie et à une approche stratégique au cas par cas, nous savons comment aider votre entreprise à devenir mieux identifiable, plus remarquable, moins comparable.

 

Product Design

Sewing Machine
Kachiran
New design for a sewing machine popular of Kachiran (Iran sewing machine)

Aider nos clients à obtenir et conserver une image de marque attractive et engageante, c’est ce que nous faisons chaque jour. Grâce au Design, à la technologie et à une approche stratégique au cas par cas, nous savons comment aider votre entreprise à devenir mieux identifiable, plus remarquable, moins comparable.

 

Website Design

defhtedh
gfnhdtht
dfhndtftht

gdnbdghdfag

Exhibition / Architect

branding
kohalin studio
branding 1 Iintro text

branding1 full text

Advetising

product1
kohalin studio
product1 Iintro text

product1 full text

Exhibition / Architect

photography1
kohalin studio
photography1 Iintro text

photography1 full text

UX & UI Design

User Experience Basics

User experience (UX) focuses on having a deep understanding of users, what they need, what they value, their abilities, and also their limitations.

It also takes into account the business goals and objectives of the group managing the project. UX best practices promote improving the quality of the user’s interaction with and perceptions of your product and any related services.

Factors that Influence UX

At the core of UX is ensuring that users find value in what you are providing to them.  Peter Morville represents this through his User Experience Honeycomb .He notes that in order for there to be a meaningful and valuable user experience, information must be:

  • Useful: Your content should be original and fulfill a need
  • Usable: Site must be easy to use
  • Desirable: Image, identity, brand, and other design elements are used to evoke emotion and appreciation
  • Findable: Content needs to be navigable and locatable onsite and offsite
  • Accessible: Content needs to be accessible to people with disabilities
  • Credible: Users must trust and believe what you tell them

Areas Related to Building the User Experience

UX is a growing field that is very much still being defined. Creating a successful user-centered design encompasses the principles of human-computer interaction (HCI) and goes further to include the following disciplines:

  • Project Management focuses on planning and organizing a project and its resources. This includes identifying and managing the lifecycle to be used, applying it to the user-centered design process, formulating the project team, and efficiently guiding the team through all phases until project completion.
  • User Research focuses on understanding user behaviors, needs, and motivations through observation techniques, task analysis, and other feedback methodologies.
  • Usability Evaluation focuses on how well users can learn and use a product to achieve their goals. It also refers to how satisfied users are with that process.
  • Information Architecture (IA) focuses on how information is organized, structured, and presented to users.
  • User Interface Design focuses on anticipating what users might need to do and ensuring that the interface has elements that are easy to access, understand, and use to facilitate those actions. 
  • Interaction Design (IxD) focuses on creating engaging interactive systems with well thought out behaviors.
  • Visual Design focuses on ensuring an aesthetically pleasing interface that is in line with brand goals.
  • Content Strategy focuses on writing and curating useful content by planning the creation, delivery and governance behind it.
  • Accessibility focuses on how a disabled individual accesses or benefits from a site, system or application. Section 508 is the governing principal for accessibility.
  • Web Analytics focuses on the collection, reporting, and analysis of website data.

References

  • Elements of User Experience diagram by Jesse James Garrett
  • User Experience Honeycomb diagram  by Peter Morville
  • The Elements of User Experience: User-Centered Design for the Web and Beyond (2nd Edition) by Jesse James Garrett 

source: www.usability.gov

UX & UI Design

Apple’s Product Development Process – Inside the World’s Greatest Design Organization

Apple’s Product Development Process may be one of the most successful design processes ever implemented. With the company verging on becoming the world’s first $1 trillion business organization – there’s a lot that designers can learn from Apple and introduce into their own design environments.

Apple is a notoriously secretive business. In Steve Jobs’ time at the company it would have been near impossible to find out about the internal workings of the business. This isn’t surprising when a business’s market advantage is its design approach. It’s worth keeping it under wraps.

However, Adam Lashinsky, the author of Inside Apple: How America’s most Admired and Secretive Company Really Works has been given a look at the process. While there are still aspects of the way that Apple works that are shrouded in secrecy – you can get a good idea of the overall high level process.

Apple’s Product Development Process

Design is at the Forefront

Author/Copyright holder: GiuliaPiccoliTrapletti . Copyright terms and licence: CC BY-SA 4.0

How do you give designers the freedom to design and ensure that the products they produce fulfil their visions? Well at Apple they put design at the forefront.

Jony Ive – the British designer that is the Chief Design Officer (CDO) at Apple– and his design team lead the company and they do not report to finance, manufacturing, etc. They are given free rein to set their own budgets and are given the ability to ignore manufacturing practicalities.

At the heart of the design department is the Industrial Design Studio where only a select few Apple employees have access.

It’s a simple concept that allows for the creation of incredible products.

Design Teams are Separated From the Larger Company

When a design team works on a new product they are then cut off from the rest of the Apple business. They may even implement physical controls to prevent the team from interacting with other Apple employees during the day.

The team is also removed from the traditional Apple hierarchy at this point. They create their own reporting structures and report directly to the executive team. This leaves them free to focus on design rather than day-to-day minutiae.

A Documented Development Process

Author/Copyright holder: Ed Uthman . Copyright terms and licence: CC BY-SA 2.5

The Apple New Product Process (ANPP) information is given to a product development team when they begin work. It details every stage of the design process and it goes into elaborate detail. The idea is to define what stages the product creation team will go through, who will be responsible for delivering the final product, who works on which stage and where they work and also when the product is expected to be completed.

Monday is Review Day

The Apple Executive Team holds a regular Monday meeting to examine every single product that the company has in design phase at that point in time. This isn’t as daunting as it may sound; one of the keys to Apple’s success is that they don’t work on hundreds of new products at once. Instead, resources are concentrated on a handful of projects that are expected to bear fruit rather than being diluted over many lesser projects.

If a product cannot be reviewed at one meeting – it’s automatically at the top of the agenda for the next meeting. In practice, this should mean that every single Apple product is inspected by the executive team at least once a fortnight. This keeps delays in decision making to a minimum and enables the company to be very lean with its approach to design.

The EPM and the GSM

The EPM is the engineering program manager and the GSM is the global supply manager. Together they are known within Apple as the “EPM Mafia”. It’s their job to take over when a product moves from design to production.

As you might expect, these people are usually going to be found in China, Apple does very little of its own manufacturing. Instead it relies on contract outsourcing companies like Foxconn (one of the largest employers in the world) to do this for them. This removes much of the headache of manufacturing for Apple whilst keeping production costs as low as possible. There is a significant market advantage to this approach and its one that many other electronics manufacturers are emulating now.

The EPM Mafia may sound scary (and they probably are to the suppliers) but their real job is simply to ensure that products are delivered to market in the right way, at the right time and at the right cost. They may disagree at points but their guiding principle is to act in the interests of the product at all times.

Iteration Is Key

Like any good design company, the design process at Apple is not over when manufacturing begins. In fact, Apple iterates the design throughout manufacturing. The product is built, it’s tested and reviewed, then the design team improves on it and it’s built all over again. These cycles take 4-6 weeks at a time and may be run many times over a product’s development lifecycle.

Author/Copyright holder: CyberDoc LLC . Copyright terms and licence: Fair Use.

When production is complete the EPM will take possession of some or all of the test devices and then take them back to Apple’s headquarters at Cupertino.

This is a very costly approach but it’s one of the reasons that Apple has a reputation for quality. The more you invest in design, the more likely you are to build incredible market changing products. It’s the process that the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad went through.

The Packaging Room

This is a very-high security area in Apple and it’s where prototypes are unboxed. As you might expect, the security is to prevent leaks to the outside world. If you ever do see a leaked prototype for an Apple product – it won’t have come from here. It’s more likely to have vanished from a production line in China.

A Launch Plan

Author/Copyright holder: Manutaus. Copyright terms and licence: CC BY-SA 3.0

The final step in Apple’s product development is product launch. When the product is considered to be as good as it can be – it enters an action plan known as “the Rules of the Road”. This explains all the responsibilities and actions that must be taken prior to a commercial launch of the product.

It must be a nerve-wracking experience to be privy to the “Rules of the Road” because if you lose it or leak it… you’re immediately fired. This is explained in the document itself.

The Take Away

Apple’s process is complex, expensive and demanding. If you compare it to most business theories – it shouldn’t work. However, to date it has out-performed even the wildest of expectations.

You may not be able to emulate all of their processes within the space of your own workplace but there’s no reason that you can’t develop written processes for design phases and launch phases of your projects, for example. And, of course, there is no reason at all for you in not iterating!

The more you know about successful design processes, the more you can take some of the best aspects of them and use them to enhance your own products.

Resources

Find out all the details of the design process in: Inside Apple: How America's Most Admired--and Secretive--Company Really Works by Adam Lashinsky ISBN 97814555512157, Published January 25, 2012

And take an insight into Apple’s greatest designer’s mind in: JonyIve: The Genius Behind Apple's Greatest Products by Leander Kahney ISBN 159184617X, Published November 14, 2013

Source: www.interaction-design.org

UX & UI Design

What Does A UX Designer Actually Do?

If you’re a UX designer, it aims to equip you with a clear and concise answer to the question — What does a UX Designer do? And for those of you who are genuinely still unsure what a UX designer does, you will definitely know by the end of this post!

UX is not new; in fact, the term has been around since the early nineties. The term has been credited to Donald Norman who joined Apple as a cognitive scientist. His desire was to explore all aspects of a user’s experience; including industrial design, graphics, the interface, and physical manual interaction. You can read all about the history of UX design here.

Since then, the term has evolved and demand for UX designers has radically increased. With the development of mobile and wearable technologies, apps and increased internet usage worldwide, UX designers are in increasing demand.

Find out if UX is for you with our free 7-day UX Design short course

Companies are realising the value UX designers bring to both the customer and their business. UX design salaries are rewarding, and they predict an 18% growth in positions opening up in the next ten years.
 

 

UX is not new; in fact, the term has been around since the early nineties. The term has been credited to Donald Norman who joined Apple as a cognitive scientist. His desire was to explore all aspects of a user’s experience; including industrial design, graphics, the interface, and physical manual interaction. You can read all about the history of UX design here.

Since then, the term has evolved and demand for UX designers has radically increased. With the development of mobile and wearable technologies, apps and increased internet usage worldwide, UX designers are in increasing demand.

Find out if UX is for you with our free 7-day UX Design short course

Companies are realising the value UX designers bring to both the customer and their business. UX design salaries are rewarding, and they predict an 18% growth in positions opening up in the next ten years.

It’s a booming industry, but how do UX designers work on a day to day basis? If you’re thinking of a career in the field, what can you expect to be doing?

Your projects will differ dramatically from company to company, as will the size of your team, and your priorities. My experience of working in UX has involved elements of research, testing, business analysis, project management and psychology as well as wireframing.

Despite the variety the role offers, there are some general functions a UX designer can be expected to perform irrespective of the company they work at.

In the next section, I’ll run through these general functions. I’ve also added a video of recently qualified UX designer Ryan’s typical working day at the end of the section – I recommend watching it to get a feel of what it’s like to work as a UX designer today.

Ryan planning a UX design sprint

User Experience Design: Initial Stages
This is where the research (magic) happens. Generally a UX designer will get a brief from the client or their manager asking them to do some project research.

Let’s use the fictitious fast food chain Foodies as an example: Imagine Foodies approach the company you work for wanting a new app.

Firstly, it would be the UX designer’s role to combine desk-based and field research to get a full picture of who they are designing for. This might include reviewing what the current website has to offer, interviewing existing users to look for opportunities and pain points, and doing competitor research to see what else is out there.

These tasks will enable the UX designer to pinpoint the core features needed for the Minimum Viable Product and start drafting some initial personas. For Foodies the core features might be a menu, ability to make online reservations and a branch finder.

Personas and Information Architecture
With the core features decided on, it is time to delve deeper into what tasks each persona wants to perform and why.

One of Foodies’ personas might be Samantha, a go-getting 20-something who likes eating artisan salads on her lunch break. An example task for her would be:

‘Samantha likes to pre-order the Moroccan Lamb Salad via the app on the phone as it saves her time between meetings.’

Once this process has been completed for each persona, it is then possible to refine the content needed, working out the information architecture and site map and beginning paper prototypes. Paper prototypes are very rough sketches which can be shown to colleagues and quickly and easily improved.

UX designer discussing user testing

Wireframes and User Testing
After paper prototypes come wireframes, user testing and plenty of iterating. Wireframes typically go through many stages and there is no right or wrong way of doing them.

They often start as very basic black and white designs, moving on to interactive designs where users can navigate between the different pages like they will with the final product, to high-res designs which give the user a really clear idea of what the final product could look like. Each stage is punctuated with user testing and iterations.

Visual Design
Next comes the visual design where wireframes are converted into mockups. Mockups include the final imagery, colour, and typography. The main focus is the look and feel; they should be pixel perfect and show exactly what the design will look like when brought to life so they can be used as a guide when development starts.

Some UX designers do the visual design themselves using programs such as Photoshop. However, visual design tends to fall under UI design, so this will normally be done by a UI designer.

UI designer talking to UX designer

Usability Testing and Beyond
With the visual design in place, there is a working prototype of the product which can be fully usability tested by participants who match the identified personas.

Read this beginner’s guide to usability testing for more information.

Several rounds of testing could take place before the design is completely right. Once it is, the new product is finally ready to go into development. UX designers also attend sprint meetings, overseeing product development to make sure there aren’t any feature creeps (which often happens in my experience!) and helping to make small refinements to the design as and when necessary.

One final point to make is that a UX designer’s work is rarely finished after the product launch. There will be refinements, small changes, new releases, feedback to gather and analytics to discuss with the team, just as Ryan describes in the video below. Technology is constantly evolving and it is essential to to keep up-to-date with the latest developments or get left behind.

What Skills Does a UX Designer Need?
With such a varied range of tasks, UX designers need to have a very diverse skillset. Besides technical and design skills like wireframing, prototyping and interpreting data and feedback, UX designers also need certain “soft” skills.

Adaptability, communication, problem-solving and teamwork are all essential soft skills. As a UX designer, it’s important that you can collaborate effectively with those around you — from clients and stakeholders to developers and fellow designers, all the way through to the end user. 

Business knowledge also goes a long way in the UX design industry. It’s important to understand both the goals of the company and the needs of the target audience, and to align these when coming up with design solutions.  

SOURCE: www.careerfoundry.com

Data Analyse

caracter1

Iintro text caracter1

full text  caracter1

Game

video1

video1 Iintro text

video1 full text

Game

website1

Iintro text website1

website1 full text

Result

IK

Company of the doors special
sayeban e no is a leadingretailer and manufacturer of blinds and shades. founded in 2001starting with roller blinds, we went on to expand into woven blinds and pleated blinds. sayeban e no has exhibited in more than 10 international exhibitions in tehran and first branch started in 2002 in shiraz. in 2011 we experienced significant growth due to customer demand and started to make sheer elegance blinds and wooden blinds and opened two new show rooms in tehran.

Result

Sayeban No

Product Doller Blinds
sayeban e no is a leading retailer and manufacturer of blinds and shades. founded in 2001starting with roller blinds, we went on to expand into woven blinds and pleated blinds. sayeban e no has exhibited in more than 10 international exhibitions in tehran and first branch started in 2002 in shiraz. in 2011 we experienced significant growth due to customer demand and started to make sheer elegance blinds and wooden blinds and opened two new show rooms in tehran.

Result

Kachiran

Iran Sewing Machine Mfg.Co.
Kachiran was found in 1980, aiming to manufacture high quality home sewing machines to meet the local demand and to export to other countries around the world. Kachiran factory was set up in Qazvin, 150km northwest of capital Tehran.

Result

Himalia

Produce Refrigerator
Refrigerator Designer Factory - Parto Sard Tavan (Himalia) Himalaya Refrigeration Products has a long standing records since 1985 in the manufacturing of high quality commercial refrigeration products as well as Kitchen Equipments etc. With an undeterred focus on customer needs, Himalaya Refrigeration Products developes & delivers ideas & technologies for their product of tomorrow.